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Sick Puppies Cast Member Q&A with Joshua Winer!

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Me and Lamont Awkard Sibling - Joshua Winer

Hey Joshua! Tell us, how did you find out about Sick Puppies Comedy?

“Improv+Boca+Raton” in Google

What got you involved and interested in improv?

I loved performing in front of folks ever since I was a child. Took plenty of acting classes in school and enjoyed the heck out of the stage. Out of nowhere I started having seizures, which got in the way of my acting. To hinder the seizures, I had part of my brain removed. Just so happened that it was the hippocampus (memory) that they took out. Couldn’t memorize lines anymore, I felt defeated. Then my brother, out of nowhere, suggested I try improv. So I searched for improv around here (Boca Raton) and was lucky enough to find the Sick Puppies.

Tell us about your first improv show ever. What was it like?

It was fun, there was a large audience, everyone was smiling. I think my smile at the end of the show was the biggest though, I was so proud to be on stage again.

What’s your favorite game/form of improv? Why?

I love many that I can’t remember the name of, but one thing in particular I love are line games. I love coming up with things on the spot.

What is the most rewarding experience you’ve had based on your life in comedy?

Performing my first improv show and being able to hear my brother’s laughter over everything else.

Newer improvisers might be surprised by how much you continue to learn from improv, no matter how long you’ve been doing it. What’s something you recently learned, or that you’re currently working on?

Not physically throwing myself around so much. I can’t help it, I come from a pro wrestling family!

What’s one piece of advice you’d give to new improvisers?

Above all else, have fun! If you’re having fun, the audience is having fun, so above all else perform for yourself!

See Joshua, along with Awkward Sibling & The Mighty Few this Saturday at 9:00p! Get tickets now: http://bit.ly/JoshW2018!

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Sick Puppies Cast Member Q&A with Andrea Comart!

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Andrea

So Andrea, how did you find out about Sick Puppies Comedy?

Through a friend!

What got you involved and interested in improv?

I wanted an outlet for stress, a place to be my weird self (or someone else, because improv!) and to meet new people with creative/fun/quirky minds.

Tell us about your first improv show ever. What was it like?

Terrifying but unforgettable. Being on stage with all lights on you and an audience with expectations can be really intimidating. I remember how fast those fears and inhibitions melted away when I focused on my cast mates and let myself just enjoy the moments as they came – the good, the bad and the awkward. At the end of the night, you’re always reminded that your improv family has your back and I think that feeling of support Is always extremely rewarding.

What’s your favorite game/form of improv? Why?

I have respect for both long form and short form games. That being said, my favorite game is one called “Follow the Leaver” which is kind of a medley of both short and long form. Follow the leaver involves establishing a scene with at least 2 characters, as the scene develops one character has a reason for leaving to which you “follow” them to the next scene while they interact with other/new characters, the goal always being to follow whoever has the excuse to remove themselves to go do something different. The “leaver” can be the same character or a different character every time, which helps create a universe in which these characters live and revolve in. I love this game because the scene possibilities and character development choices are really endless. It’s a fun blend of the two improv styles.

What is the most rewarding experience you’ve had based on your life in comedy?

The camaraderie and sense of family is what I love most about being part of Sick Puppies. There is a lot of trust and vulnerability that comes with improv, always feeling accepted regardless of whatever random, weird or inappropriate thing that just came flying out of your mouth is liberating.

Newer improvisers might be surprised by how much you continue to learn from improv, no matter how long you’ve been doing it. What’s something you recently learned, or that you’re currently working on?

I’m currently pushing myself to make bolder character choices. Right now I’m really working on accents and being more animated in a way that is convincing and embodies the character Im bring to life.

What’s one piece of advice you’d give to new improvisers?

Listen and gift. Let go of thinking about the funny lines you want to deliver for laughs. Instead, listen and focus on honestly reacting to your scene partner. Gift them with details, emotions, motives, etc. When both partners focus on making each other successful in their scene, the laughs, the energy and the flow will happen naturally. You will create a scene that an audience will love getting swept up in with characters that they will root for.

See Andrea, along with The Clamazons this Saturday at 8:00p in Wilton Manors! Get tickets now: http://bit.ly/AndreaC2018

Sick Puppies Cast Member Q&A with Barry Rosenblum!

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23471897_10112260055517281_8673084007245258837_n - Barry Rosenblum

Hey Barry! How did you find out about Sick Puppies Comedy?

I found out about Sick Puppies while I was living in New York City and attending the Del Close Marathon (An improv marathon hosted by the UCB in NYC that consist of 3 days of non-stop improv). I knew I was going to be moving back to South Florida soon and seeing that they were part of this gigantic marathon inspired me to call them and get involved.

What got you involved and interested in improv?

As a little kid I wanted to try comedy after becoming obsessed with Comedy Central Presents and of course Saturday Night Live. At the time I was too young to be admitted into any stand up comedy class, but my mother found improv for kids at a local theater and I was immediately hooked.

Tell us about your first improv show ever. What was it like?

My first show was an awesome blur of adrenaline and excitement. I can’t remember much, but do remember one of my favorite first scenes was about these 2 astronauts traveling in a rocket and being extremely excited about going to outer space. Eventually the level of excitement got so high in the characters that we were nearly insane, and because of our crazy insane level of excitement the scene eventually made a turn where we were ended up actually being two people in a basement trying to get to space in a cardboard rocket ship.

What’s your favorite game/form of improv? Why?

My favorite game right now is more of a warmup called Fuzzy Duck, where improvisers stand in a circle and say either Fuzzy Duck or Ducky Fuzz as quickly as possible going around in a circle. The game more or less has it built in that eventually someone will curse and get people to laugh, so I like it because it is just plain silly and gets people out of their heads.

What is the most rewarding experience you’ve had based on your life in comedy?

Getting to design and teach comedy classes to students who have never taken any sort of comedy class, and then have them come back after because they want more is undeniably the most rewarding part of doing comedy in my life.

Newer improvisers might be surprised by how much you continue to learn from improv, no matter how long you’ve been doing it. What’s something you recently learned, or that you’re currently working on?

I’m constantly reading and researching to learn new exercises, warmups, and forms to be able to approach what I’m doing in a more clear and concise way. Currently I’m trying to explore and focus on a more efficient way to teach “game of the scene” and my team is currently working on a format called the Pretty Flower which focuses very heavily on character exploration.

What’s one piece of advice you’d give to new improvisers?

See shows! One of the best ways to get better at improv is it watch it live. It’s easier to do good improv if you know what good improv looks like. And while in scenes listen more and stop planning, if we simply listen, have an emotion, and respond to what we hear based on that emotion the scenes become easier.

See Barry, along with Miniature Giant this Saturday at 9:30p at Sick Puppies Comedy! Get tickets now: http://bit.ly/BarryR2018

Sick Puppies Cast Member Q&A with Sara Solano!

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Sara, you’ve been doing improv for a while. How did you find out about Sick Puppies Comedy?

Cast member Robyn Cassel eavesdropped on a conversation I was having at The Alchemist coffee shop in Wilton Manors with a coworker; we somehow got on the topic of me having done improv in a past life, and she told (lovingly commanded?) me to enroll in classes.

What got you involved and interested in improv?

I started doing improv in college at the University of Florida with Theatre Strike Force in the fall of 2009. I grew up watching Whose Line?, UCB YouTube videos, and sketch shows and figured well, why not?

Tell us about your first improv show ever. What was it like?

It was in the Jennings freshman dorm building at UF, in their common room area with vending machines and gross old couches. The stage was four tables put together, and I skinned my knee (through my jeans) during a particularly intense game of Chain Murder. The three STEM majors who showed up thought that was VERY funny.

What’s your favorite game/form of improv? Why?

La Ronde is my favorite long form piece right now because I absolutely love delving into strong character work and seeing how each player’s deliberate character choices play into one another to make a cohesive world in which these weirdos cohabitate. Also, the Intervention is just a really, really fun structure in which to play.

What is the most rewarding experience you’ve had based on your life in comedy?

I was one of a handful of members of Sick Puppies who volunteered with the teachers and staff of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School for an improv workshop, and it was truly the most impactful way I’ve ever used comedy. If I could go back and witness/participate in the power of silliness and vulnerability as a method for healing every day, I would in a minute.

Newer improvisers might be surprised by how much you continue to learn from improv, no matter how long you’ve been doing it. What’s something you recently learned, or that you’re currently working on?

The “game” doesn’t have to be something outlandish or joke-y. Trust the choices of you and your scene partner to find the game organically without feeling obligated to force it when it feels like you don’t have something immediately playable.

What’s one piece of advice you’d give to new improvisers?

Be confident in what your brain is telling you. If your brain or feet are moving, listen to them. Trust your instincts, and do your best to stop second-guessing yourself to wonder if what you feel compelled to say is funny or a “good” move. Do the thing!

See Sara, along with The Mighty Few this Saturday at 9:30p at Sick Puppies Comedy! Get tickets now: http://bit.ly/SaraS2018!

Sick Puppies Comedy Cast Q&A with Ryan Lieber!

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RyanL

 

So, Ryan, tell us…how did you find out about Sick Puppies Comedy?

Tired of just coming home after work every night and sitting in front of my TV, I was looking for something different that would interest me. I searched improv comedy on the web and found SPC. That was six years ago and I’ve been a part of the troupe ever since.

What got you involved and interested in improv?

Growing up in Chicago, which is considered the mecca of improv, I got to see shows at Second City when I was a kid and always thought it was so funny. I thought it would be fun to do it as an adult and I went for it.

Tell us about your first improv show ever. What was it like?

I remember going to Second City in Chicago for one of their “adult shows” when I was younger. I was so impressed with the talent and how the improvisers were able to think of such funny ideas in a split second. It looked like so much fun.

What’s your favorite game/form of improv? Why?

I’ve always been a sucker for short form. It’s quick, is always good for a laugh, and the audience finds it enjoyable too.

What is the most rewarding experience you’ve had based on your life in comedy?

I just enjoy seeing how much the audience is laughing and taking in the show. When an audience member tells you after the show how much they enjoyed it, it feels great to know I made someone laugh for a hour and was able to take them away from whatever stress or issues they may have going on in their lives.

Newer improvisers might be surprised by how much you continue to learn from improv, no matter how long you’ve been doing it. What’s something you recently learned, or that you’re currently working on?

Improv is kind of like the game of golf. No matter how long you’ve played it or performed it, you’re never going to master it. You can always improve and be better every time you go out there to perform.

What’s one piece of advice you’d give to new improvisers?

Be open to everything. Don’t feel ashamed about any ideas you have. Go out there and say whatever you feel for a scene. Improv is about trusting yourself and your fellow players. We’re all here to support your ideas and decisions when you’re on stage.

See Ryan, along with #NoFilter and Daddy’s Little Nest Egg this Saturday at 9p at Sick Puppies Comedy! Get tickets now: http://bit.ly/RyanL2018!